End Polio Now

During Rotary’s 104th anniversary, floodlight messages across some of the world’s most iconic landmarks are lit with the message “End Polio Now”

The “End Polio Now” message is beamed on to the Sydney Opera House, Australia Mark Wallace/Rotary Down Under
The “End Polio Now” message is beamed on to the Sydney Opera House, Australia
Mark Wallace/Rotary Down Under

From Sydney’s Opera House to Rome’s Coliseum, from Cape Town’s Table Mountain to New York’s High Falls, Rotary’s commitment to “End Polio Now” is lighting up the night sky. Every night this week – Rotary’s 104th anniversary – floodlit messages across some of the world’s most iconic landmarks will call on the millions that see them to join the remarkable 20-year campaign to rid the world of polio.

“By illuminating these historic landmarks with our pledge to end polio, Rotary clubs are announcing to the world that we will not stop until the goal is achieved,” says Jonathan Majiyagbe, the Rotary Foundation’s trustee chair. “We hope people everywhere will see these words, either in person or through the media, and join with us and our partners in this historic effort to rid the world of polio once and for all.”
This year, Rotary has committed to raising $200 million to be spent in support of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, a partnership spearheaded by WHO, Rotary International, the US Centers for Disease Control and UNICEF.

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