Looking for every last poliovirus in global sample collections

The global intensification of efforts to appropriately contain polioviruses is critical.

To supplement Global Action Plan III for the containment of polioviruses, WHO has published guidance for non-polio facilities to help them identify, destroy, or safely and securely handle and store sample collections potentially infectious for poliovirus.

Dr Mark Pallansch from CDC explains what the guidance means for facilities worldwide.

Poliovirus potentially infectious materials (PIM) include fecal, nasopharyngeal, or sewage samples collected in a time and place where wild polioviruses/vaccine-derived polioviruses (WPV/VDPV), or OPV-derived viruses were circulating or oral polio vaccines (OPV/Sabin) were in use. Non-polio research facilities with a high probability of storing such materials include those working with rotavirus or other enteric agents, hepatitis viruses, influenza/respiratory viruses, and measles virus. Other facilities could include those conducting nutrition research or environmental facilities.


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