Looking for every last poliovirus in global sample collections

The global intensification of efforts to appropriately contain polioviruses is critical.

To supplement Global Action Plan III for the containment of polioviruses, WHO has published guidance for non-polio facilities to help them identify, destroy, or safely and securely handle and store sample collections potentially infectious for poliovirus.

Dr Mark Pallansch from CDC explains what the guidance means for facilities worldwide.

Poliovirus potentially infectious materials (PIM) include fecal, nasopharyngeal, or sewage samples collected in a time and place where wild polioviruses/vaccine-derived polioviruses (WPV/VDPV), or OPV-derived viruses were circulating or oral polio vaccines (OPV/Sabin) were in use. Non-polio research facilities with a high probability of storing such materials include those working with rotavirus or other enteric agents, hepatitis viruses, influenza/respiratory viruses, and measles virus. Other facilities could include those conducting nutrition research or environmental facilities.


Related News

   30/10/2018
We speak to Dr Arlene King, Chair of the RCC for the Americas, and GCC Containment Working Group, about the vital importance of safe and secure containment of polioviruses and the risk and responsibility that come with retaining the pathogen.
   08/10/2018
Group continues its historical support
   26/09/2018
The last man with smallpox was an advocate for polio eradication.
   12/09/2018
Anand Balachandran, former Coordinator Polio Transition, speaks to us about ensuring the infrastructure built up to eradicate polio will continue to benefit broader public health goals, long after the disease has been eradicated.
   31/08/2018
Meet WHO’s Chris Maher, who has spent 25 years following polio to its last hiding places.
   30/08/2018
Kofi Annan, former Secretary-General of the United Nations, made significant and important contributions to global efforts to eradicate polio.