Rotarian polio survivor takes advocacy work to Afghanistan and Australia

Ramesh Ferris, Canadian Rotarian and polio survivor, travels to Australian and Afghanistan to advocate for polio-free world.

Ramesh Ferris (centre) at the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Perth, with the heads of state of Australian, Canada, Nigeria, Pakistan and the United Kingdom. Rotary International, Petina Dixon-Jenkins
Ramesh Ferris (centre) at the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Perth, with the heads of state of Australian, Canada, Nigeria, Pakistan and the United Kingdom. Rotary International, Petina Dixon-Jenkins
 Ramesh Ferris, Canadian Rotarian and himself polio survivor, last month travelled to Australia to work with key partners, including the Global Poverty Project, in helping to secure additional key funds for the global polio eradication effort. Ferris has been a long-time advocate for the worldwide effort to eradicate polio.

His efforts in promoting a polio-free world in Australia follow a trip in September to Afghanistan, one of four remaining polio-endemic countries (alongside India, Nigeria and Pakistan). Ferris met with government officials, doctors and parents, to discuss the urgent need for all Afghan children to be fully immunized against polio.

For more please visit Rotary web site or Mr Ramesh Ferris web site.


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